Ipratropium/salbutamol

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Ipratropium/salbutamol
Combination of
Ipratropium bromideMuscarinic antagonist
SalbutamolShort-acting β2-adrenergic agonist
Names
Trade namesCombivent, DuoNeb, Breva, others
Clinical data
Pregnancy
category
  • US: C (Risk not ruled out)[1]
Routes of
use
Inhalation
Defined daily dosenot established[2]
External links
AHFS/Drugs.comProfessional Drug Facts
MedlinePlusa601063
Legal
License data
Legal status
  • AU: S3 (Pharmacist only)
  • UK: POM (Prescription only)
  • US: ℞-only
  (verify)

Ipratropium/salbutamol, sold under the brand name Combivent among others, is a combination medication used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).[3][4] It contains ipratropium (an anticholinergic) and salbutamol (albuterol, a β2-adrenergic agonist).[3] It is taken by inhalation.[5]

Common side effects include sore throat, muscle cramps, and nausea.[3] Other side effects may include bronchospasm, allergic reactions, and upper respiratory tract infections.[3] Safety in pregnancy is unclear.[1] Each medication typically decreases bronchospasm and does so via different mechanisms.[3]

The combination was approved for medical use in the United States in 1996.[5] It is available as a generic medication.[4] Sixty doses in the United Kingdom costs the NHS about 18 £ as of 2019.[4] In the United States the wholesale cost of this amount is about US$9.50.[6] In 2017, it was the 172nd most commonly prescribed medication in the United States, with more than three million prescriptions.[7][8]

Dosage

The defined daily dose is not established.[2]

Society and culture

Since Combivent contains a chlorofluorocarbon based propellant, it is being phased out in European Union countries. Chloroflourocarbons (CFC) are attributed to depletion of the ozone layer.

Cost

Sixty doses in the United Kingdom costs the NHS about 18 £ as of 2019.[4]In the United States the wholesale cost of this amount is about US$9.50.[6] In 2017, it was the 172nd most commonly prescribed medication in the United States, with more than three million prescriptions.[7][8]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Albuterol / ipratropium Use During Pregnancy". Drugs.com. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "WHOCC - ATC/DDD Index". www.whocc.no. Retrieved 9 September 2020.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 "DailyMed - ipratropium bromide and albuterol sulfate inhalant". dailymed.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 British national formulary : BNF 76 (76 ed.). Pharmaceutical Press. 2018. p. 247. ISBN 9780857113382.
  5. 5.0 5.1 "Ipratropium and Albuterol - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses". Drugs.com. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  6. 6.0 6.1 "NADAC as of 2019-02-27". Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  7. 7.0 7.1 "The Top 300 of 2020". ClinCalc. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  8. 8.0 8.1 "Albuterol Sulfate; Ipratropium Bromide - Drug Usage Statistics". ClinCalc. Retrieved 11 April 2020.

External links

Identifiers:
  • DailyMed
  • Consumer Medication Information from PubMed
  • National Asthma Education and Prevention Program Expert Panel 3. Expert panel report 3: guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. Bethesda (MD): National Institutes of Health. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; 2007 Aug. NIH Publication No. 07-4051.