Otenzepad

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Otenzepad
Otenzepad.svg
Structure of Otenzepad
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
oral
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability45% (oral)[1]
Elimination half-life2.5h
Identifiers
  • 11-[2-[2-(diethylaminomethyl)piperidin-1-yl]acetyl]-5H-pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepin-6-one
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEBI
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.220.541 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC24H31N5O2
Molar mass421.545 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • CCN(CC)CC1CCCCN1CC(=O)N2C3=CC=CC=C3C(=O)NC4=C2N=CC=C4
  • InChI=1S/C24H31N5O2/c1-3-27(4-2)16-18-10-7-8-15-28(18)17-22(30)29-21-13-6-5-11-19(21)24(31)26-20-12-9-14-25-23(20)29/h5-6,9,11-14,18H,3-4,7-8,10,15-17H2,1-2H3,(H,26,31)
  • Key:UBRKDAVQCKZSPO-UHFFFAOYSA-N

Otenzepad is a competitive muscarinic receptor antagonist that is relatively selective at the M2 receptor. It was investigated as a treatment for arrhythmia and bradycardia due to its cardioselectivity but research ceased after stage III clinical trials. The drug was originally developed by the German pharmaceutical company, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma KG.[1]

Pharmacodynamics

The (+)-enantiomer has 8 times greater potency at the M2 receptor than the (-)-enantiomer.[1]

Potency of Otenzepad at muscarinic receptor isoforms[1]
mAChR isoform Dissociation constant (Ki)
M1 537.0 - 1300nM[1][2]
M2 81.0 - 186nM[1][2]
M3 838 - 2089.0nM[2][1]
M4 407.0 - 1800nM[1][2]
M5 2800nM[2]


See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Otenzepad". National Centre for Advancing Translational Sciences. Retrieved 10 June 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d e Buckley NJ, Bonner TI, Buckley CM, Brann MR (1989). "Antagonist binding properties of five cloned muscarinic receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells". Mol. Pharmacol. 35 (4): 469–76. PMID 2704370.