Ibalizumab

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Ibalizumab
Monoclonal antibody
TypeWhole antibody
SourceHumanized (from mouse)
TargetCD4
Names
Trade namesTrogarzo
Other namesIbalizumab-uiyk; TMB-355,[1] TNX-355
Clinical data
Main usesHIV/AIDS[2]
Side effectsRash, diarrhea, dizziness, headache, nausea, tiredness[2]
Pregnancy
category
  • US: N (Not classified yet)
Routes of
use
Intravenous (IV)
External links
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
US NLMIbalizumab
MedlinePlusa618020
Legal
License data
Legal status
 ☒NcheckY (what is this?)  (verify)

Ibalizumab, sold under the brand name Trogarzo, is a medication used to treat HIV/AIDS.[2] It is used, together with other medications, when standard treatments are not effective.[2] It is given by injection into a vein.[2]

Common side effects include rash, diarrhea, dizziness, headache, nausea, and tiredness.[2] Other side effects may include immune reconstitution syndrome.[3] Safety in pregnancy is unclear.[3] It is a monoclonal antibody that binds to CD4 and prevents HIV from entering cells.[2]

Ibalizumab was approved for medical use in the United States in 2018 and Europe in 2019.[3][2] In the United States the initial dose costs about 13,400 USD, with further treatment about 11,000 USD per month as of 2021.[4] It is not commercially available in the United Kingdom and Europe as of 2021.[5]

Medical uses

Dosage

It is given at an initial dose of 2,000 mg and than given as 800 mg every two weeks.[2]

History

Ibalizumab is being developed by TaiMed Biologics but was originally developed by Tanox, now part of Genentech. As part of Genentech's takeover of Tanox, the patent for ibalizumab was sold to TaiMed Biologics, a biotech company formed in 2007 with support from the Taiwanese Government through a $20 million investment by the state-owned National Development Fund.[6][7][8]

Milestones for the intravenous (i.v.) infusion dosage form:[9]

  • 2003: completed a phase-1a clinical trial for i.v. infusion dosage form.
  • 2003: granted fast track status by U.S. FDA.
  • 2003: completed a phase-1b clinical trial for i.v. infusion dosage form.
  • 2006: completed a phase-2a clinical trial for i.v. infusion dosage form.
  • 2011: completed a phase-2b clinical trial for i.v. infusion dosage form.
  • 2012: completed a phase-1 clinical trial for s.c. injection dosage form.
  • 2013: initiated a phase-1/2 clinical trial for s.c. and i.m. injection dosage forms (on-going).
  • 2014: granted orphan drug designation for HIV MDR patients by U.S. FDA.
  • 2015: granted breakthrough therapy designation for i.v. infusion dosage form by U.S. FDA.
  • 2015: initiated a phase-3 clinical trial for i.v. infusion dosage form (on-going).
  • 2016: initiated and intended to complete a rolling BLA submission for i.v. infusion dosage form to U.S. FDA.
  • 2016: completion of a phase-3 clinical trial for i.v. infusion dosage form
  • 2017: completion of BLA submission and pre-approval inspection for i.v. infusion dosage form to U.S. FDA
  • 2018: U.S. market approval (trade name: Trogarzo)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers it to be a first-in-class medication.[10]

See also

References

  1. "Ibalizumab (TMB-355)". TaiMed Biologics. 2009-09-09. Archived from the original on 2009-08-20.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 "Trogarzo". Retrieved 24 November 2021.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "Ibalizumab-uiyk Monograph for Professionals". Drugs.com. Retrieved 24 November 2021.
  4. "Trogarzo Prices, Coupons & Patient Assistance Programs". Drugs.com. Retrieved 24 November 2021.
  5. "Ibalizumab". SPS - Specialist Pharmacy Service. 9 November 2016. Retrieved 24 November 2021.
  6. "Genentech Partners with Taiwan Company on AIDS Drug". Seeking Alpha. 2007-09-18.
  7. "Government pushes biotech industry". Taipei Times. 2007-09-15.
  8. "Tanox's AIDS Drug Survives". BioHouston. 2008-04-11. Archived from the original on 2011-07-25.
  9. "Ibalizumab (TMB-355) Intravenous Infusion". www.taimedbiologics.com. TaiMed. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  10. New Drug Therapy Approvals 2018 (PDF). U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (Report). January 2019. Retrieved 16 September 2020.

External links

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