Pacritinib

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Pacritinib
Pacritinib skeletal.svg
Clinical data
Trade namesVonjo
Other namesSB1518
License data
Routes of
administration
By mouth
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
  • (16E)-11-[2-(1-Pyrrolidinyl)ethoxy]-14,19-dioxa-5,7,26-triazatetracyclo[19.3.1.12,6.18,12]heptacosa-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-decaene
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
PDB ligand
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC28H32N4O3
Molar mass472.589 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • c1cc2cc(c1)-c3ccnc(n3)Nc4ccc(c(c4)COC/C=C/COC2)OCCN5CCCC5
  • InChI=1S/C28H32N4O3/c1-2-13-32(12-1)14-17-35-27-9-8-25-19-24(27)21-34-16-4-3-15-33-20-22-6-5-7-23(18-22)26-10-11-29-28(30-25)31-26/h3-11,18-19H,1-2,12-17,20-21H2,(H,29,30,31)/b4-3+
  • Key:HWXVIOGONBBTBY-ONEGZZNKSA-N

Pacritinib, sold under the brand name Vonjo, is an anti-cancer medication used to treat myelofibrosis.[1][2] It is a macrocyclic Janus kinase inhibitor. It mainly inhibits Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3).

Common side effects include diarrhea, low platelet counts, nausea, anemia, and swelling in legs.[2]

Medical uses

Pacritinib in indicated to treat adults who have a rare form of a bone marrow disorder known as intermediate or high-risk primary or secondary myelofibrosis and who have platelet (blood clotting cells) levels below 50,000/µL.[1][2]

History

The effectiveness and safety of pacritinib were demonstrated in a study that included 63 participants with intermediate or high-risk primary or secondary myelofibrosis and low platelets who received pacritinib 200 mg twice daily or standard treatment.[2] Effectiveness was determined based upon the proportion of participants who had a 35% or greater spleen volume reduction from baseline to week 24.[2] Nine participants (29%) in the pacritinib treatment group had a 35% or greater spleen volume reduction, compared to one participant (3%) in the standard treatment group.[2]

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted the application for pacritinib priority review, fast track, and orphan drug designations.[2]

Society and culture

Names

Pacritinib is the International nonproprietary name (INN).[3][4]

References

  1. ^ a b c "Vonjo- pacritinib capsule". DailyMed. 7 March 2022. Retrieved 24 March 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "FDA approves drug for adults with rare form of bone marrow disorder". U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 1 March 2022. Retrieved 3 March 2022. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  3. ^ World Health Organization (2010). "International nonproprietary names for pharmaceutical substances (INN). proposed INN: list 104" (PDF). WHO Drug Information. 24 (4): 386. hdl:10665/74579.
  4. ^ World Health Organization (2011). "International nonproprietary names for pharmaceutical substances (INN): recommended INN: list 66". WHO Drug Information. 25 (3). hdl:10665/74683.

External links

  • "Pacritinib". Drug Information Portal. U.S. National Library of Medicine.