Fenbufen

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Fenbufen
Fenbufen.svg
Fenbufen-from-xtal-1988-3D-balls.png
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.comInternational Drug Names
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
  • UK: POM (Prescription only)
Identifiers
  • 4-(4-Biphenylyl)-4-oxobutanoic acid
    or
    4-Oxo-4-(4-phenylphenyl)butanoic acid
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.048.148 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC16H14O3
Molar mass254.2854 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • O=C(O)CCC(=O)c2ccc(c1ccccc1)cc2
  • InChI=1S/C16H14O3/c17-15(10-11-16(18)19)14-8-6-13(7-9-14)12-4-2-1-3-5-12/h1-9H,10-11H2,(H,18,19) checkY
  • Key:ZPAKPRAICRBAOD-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
 ☒NcheckY (what is this?)  (verify)

Fenbufen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the propionic acid derivatives class.[1]

It was introduced by American Cyanamid under the trade name Lederfen in the 1980s. Due to liver toxicity, it was withdrawn from markets in the developed world in 2010.[2][3]:370, 383–384

As of 2015 it was available in Taiwan and Thailand under several brand names.[4]

References

  1. ^ Brogden RN (1986). "Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics other than salicylates". Drugs. 32 Suppl 4: 27–45. doi:10.2165/00003495-198600324-00004. PMID 3552584. S2CID 25471102.
  2. ^ "Deleted products 2010". Monthly Index of Medical Specialities.
  3. ^ Lewis JH, Stine JG (2013). "Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs and Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists. Chapter 22". In Kaplowitz N, DeLeve LD (eds.). Drug-Induced Liver Disease (3rd ed.). Academic Press. ISBN 978-0-12-387818-2.
  4. ^ "International listings for fenbufen". Drugs.com. Retrieved 25 June 2015.