Rutecarpine

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Rutecarpine
Rutecarpine.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
8,13-Hydroindolo[2′,3′:3,4]pyrido[2,1-b]quinazolin-5(7H)-one
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.163.752 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 635-907-6
KEGG
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C18H13N3O/c22-18-13-6-2-4-8-15(13)20-17-16-12(9-10-21(17)18)11-5-1-3-7-14(11)19-16/h1-8,19H,9-10H2
    Key: ACVGWSKVRYFWRP-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • InChI=1/C18H13N3O/c22-18-13-6-2-4-8-15(13)20-17-16-12(9-10-21(17)18)11-5-1-3-7-14(11)19-16/h1-8,19H,9-10H2
    Key: ACVGWSKVRYFWRP-UHFFFAOYAZ
  • C1CN2C(=NC3=CC=CC=C3C2=O)C4=C1C5=CC=CC=C5N4
Properties
C18H13N3O
Molar mass 287.322 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Rutecarpine or rutaecarpine is a COX-2 inhibitor isolated from Tetradium ruticarpum.[1] It is claimed as one of the non-basic alkaloids.[2]

In contrast to synthetic COX-2 inhibitors like Etoricoxib and Celecoxib Rutecarpine does not show their negative effects on the cardiovascular system; in fact it even does compensate for the adverse effects usually caused by COX-2 inhibition.[3]

References

  1. ^ Moon, T. C.; Murakami, M.; Kudo, I.; Son, K. H.; Kim, H. P.; Kang, S. S.; Chang, H. W. (1999). "A new class of COX-2 inhibitor, rutaecarpine from Evodia rutaecarpa". Inflammation Research. 48 (12): 621–625. doi:10.1007/s000110050512. PMID 10669112. S2CID 19555209.
  2. ^ Manske, R. H. F. (1950). "Sources of alkaloids and their isolation". In Manske, R. H. F.; Holmes, H. L. (eds.). The Alkaloids: Chemistry and Physiology. 1. Academic Press. pp. 1–14. doi:10.1016/S1876-0813(08)60184-0. ISBN 978-0-12-469501-6. S2CID 82529003.
  3. ^ Jia, Sujie; Hu, Changping (2010). "Pharmacological effects of rutaecarpine as a cardiovascular protective agent". Molecules. 15 (3): 1873–1881. doi:10.3390/molecules15031873. PMC 6257227. PMID 20336017. S2CID 21968872.