Botryomycosis

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Botryomycosis
Other names: Bacterial pseudomycosis
Botryomycosis.png
SpecialtyInfectious disease
SymptomsCrusted, purulent large bumps, discharging sulphur granules, scars[1]
CausesStaphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, E. Coli, Proteus, Streptococcus, Bacteroides[1]
Risk factorsWeak immune system, HIV, alcoholism, Job syndrome[1]
Diagnostic methodCulture of discharge[1]
TreatmentAntibiotics, surgical removal[1]
FrequencyUncommon[1]

Botryomycosis is a bacterial skin infection that typically presents with crusted, purulent large bumps.[1] Sulphur granules generally discharge via sinuses, which heal leaving thin skinned scars.[1]

It is most frequently caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and less frequently by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, E. Coli, Proteus, and Streptococcus, Bacteroides.[1] Risk factors include weak immune system, HIV, alcoholism, and Job syndrome.[1]

Diagnosis is by culture of the discharge.[1] Treatment involves antibiotics and surgical removal.[1]

The condition is uncommon.[1]

Signs and symptoms

It typically presents with crusted, purulent large bumps.[1] Sulphur granules generally discharge via sinuses, which heal leaving thin skinned scars.[1]

Causes and risk factors

It is most frequently caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and less frequently by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, E. Coli, Proteus, Streptococcus and Bacteroides.[1] Risk factors include weak immune system, HIV, alcoholism, and Job syndrome.[1]

Diagnosis

Epidemiology

The condition is uncommon.[1]

History

The disease was originally discovered by Otto Bollinger (1843–1909) in 1870, and its name was coined by Sebastiano Rivolta (1832–1893) in 1884. The name refers to its grape-like granules (Gr. botryo = grapes) and the mistakenly implied fungal etiology (Gr. mykes = fungus).[2] In 1919 the bacterial origin of the infection was discovered.

Other animals

Botryomycosis has been known to affect humans, horses, cattle, swine, dogs and cats.[citation needed]

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 James, William D.; Elston, Dirk; Treat, James R.; Rosenbach, Misha A.; Neuhaus, Isaac (2020). "14. Bacterial infections". Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology (13th ed.). Edinburgh: Elsevier. p. 256-257. ISBN 978-0-323-54753-6.
  2. Medscape Today Archived 2015-02-01 at the Wayback Machine Primary Pulmonary Botryomycosis