Vestibular papillomatosis

From WikiProjectMed
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Vestibular papillomatosis
Vestibular papillomatosis.png
SpecialtyDermatology, gynaecology
SymptomsPainless small rounded bumps in genital area of females[1]
ComplicationsNone[1]
Usual onsetPregnancy, near menopause[1]
CausesNormal[1]
Diagnostic methodVisualization[1]
Differential diagnosisFordyce spots,[2] genital warts[3]
TreatmentNone[1]
Frequency50% of females before menopause[1]

Vestibular papillomatosis (VP) are normal small bumps in the genital area of females.[1] These bumps appear in multiple numbers, are rounded and are not painful, itchy or uncomfortable.[1] They are comparable to pearly penile papules, which occur in males.[2]

VP is not infectious and is not caused by HPV.[1] Diagnosis is by visualization.[1] The bumps are less yellow and more pinkish when compared to Fordyce spots.[2] They should not be mistaken for genital warts.[3] Reassurance can be given and no treatment is required.[1]

VP is present in up to half of females approaching menopause.[1] It is common in pregnancy.[1] Historically it was sometimes incorrectly referred to as "microwarts".[3]

Signs and symptoms

VP appears as small bumps in the genital area of females, typically occurring in multiple numbers, are rounded and are not painful, itchy or uncomfortable.[1] They are analogous to pearly penile papules, which occur in males.[2]

Diagnosis

Diagnosis is by visualization.[1] The bumps are less yellow and more pinkish when compared to Fordyce spots.[2] Human papillomavirus (HPV) condylomas may appear similar.[2]

Epidemiology

Half of premenopausal females have them.[1] They are common in pregnancy.[1]

See also

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 Lewia, Fiona (2019). "21. Genital dermatoses". In Morris-Jones, Rachael (ed.). ABC of Dermatology (7th ed.). Hoboken: Wiley Blackwell. p. 175. ISBN 978-1-119-48899-6. Archived from the original on 2023-07-01. Retrieved 2023-06-28.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Sanchez, Isabella; Raffi, Jodie; Kraus, Christina N. (23 February 2022). "Vulvar Neoplasms (Part II)". Urology: S0090–4295(22)00151–0. doi:10.1016/j.urology.2022.02.007. ISSN 1527-9995. PMID 35218865. Archived from the original on 27 February 2022. Retrieved 6 June 2022.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Passos, Mauro Romero Leal (2017). "11. Differential diagnosis". Atlas of Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Clinical Aspects and Differential Diagnosis. Springer. p. 383. ISBN 978-3-319-57470-7. Archived from the original on 2023-02-09. Retrieved 2023-02-09.