CXCL11

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CXCL11
Protein CXCL11 PDB 1rjt.png
Available structures
PDBHuman UniProt search: PDBe RCSB
Identifiers
AliasesCXCL11, H174, I-TAC, IP-9, IP9, SCYB11, SCYB9B, b-R1, C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 11
External IDsOMIM: 604852 HomoloGene: 3944 GeneCards: CXCL11
Orthologs
SpeciesHumanMouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_005409
NM_001302123

n/a

RefSeq (protein)

NP_001289052
NP_005400

n/a

Location (UCSC)Chr 4: 76.03 – 76.04 Mbn/a
PubMed search[2]n/a
Wikidata
View/Edit Human

C-X-C motif chemokine 11 (CXCL11) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CXCL11 gene.[3]

C-X-C motif chemokine 11 is a small cytokine belonging to the CXC chemokine family that is also called Interferon-inducible T-cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC) and Interferon-gamma-inducible protein 9 (IP-9). It is highly expressed in peripheral blood leukocytes, pancreas and liver, with moderate levels in thymus, spleen and lung and low expression levels were in small intestine, placenta and prostate.[4]

Gene expression of CXCL11 is strongly induced by IFN-γ and IFN-β, and weakly induced by IFN-α.[5] This chemokine elicits its effects on its target cells by interacting with the cell surface chemokine receptor CXCR3, with a higher affinity than do the other ligands for this receptor, CXCL9 and CXCL10.[4][6] CXCL11 is chemotactic for activated T cells. Its gene is located on human chromosome 4 along with many other members of the CXC chemokine family.[7][8]

Biomarkers

CXCL9, -10, -11 have proven to be valid biomarkers for the development of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, suggesting an underlining pathophysiological relation between levels of these chemokines and the development of adverse cardiac remodeling.[9][10]

References

  1. ^ a b c GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000169248 - Ensembl, May 2017
  2. ^ "Human PubMed Reference:". National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  3. ^ "Entrez Gene: CXCL11 chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 11".
  4. ^ a b Cole KE, Strick CA, Paradis TJ, Ogborne KT, Loetscher M, Gladue RP, Lin W, Boyd JG, Moser B, Wood DE, Sahagan BG, Neote K (June 1998). "Interferon-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC): a novel non-ELR CXC chemokine with potent activity on activated T cells through selective high affinity binding to CXCR3". The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 187 (12): 2009–21. doi:10.1084/jem.187.12.2009. PMC 2212354. PMID 9625760.
  5. ^ Rani MR, Foster GR, Leung S, Leaman D, Stark GR, Ransohoff RM (September 1996). "Characterization of beta-R1, a gene that is selectively induced by interferon beta (IFN-beta) compared with IFN-alpha". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 271 (37): 22878–84. doi:10.1074/jbc.271.37.22878. PMID 8798467.
  6. ^ Tensen CP, Flier J, Van Der Raaij-Helmer EM, Sampat-Sardjoepersad S, Van Der Schors RC, Leurs R, Scheper RJ, Boorsma DM, Willemze R (May 1999). "Human IP-9: A keratinocyte-derived high affinity CXC-chemokine ligand for the IP-10/Mig receptor (CXCR3)". The Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 112 (5): 716–22. doi:10.1046/j.1523-1747.1999.00581.x. PMID 10233762.
  7. ^ Erdel M, Laich A, Utermann G, Werner ER, Werner-Felmayer G (1998). "The human gene encoding SCYB9B, a putative novel CXC chemokine, maps to human chromosome 4q21 like the closely related genes for MIG (SCYB9) and INP10 (SCYB10)". Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics. 81 (3–4): 271–2. doi:10.1159/000015043. PMID 9730616. S2CID 46846304.
  8. ^ O'Donovan N, Galvin M, Morgan JG (1999). "Physical mapping of the CXC chemokine locus on human chromosome 4". Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics. 84 (1–2): 39–42. doi:10.1159/000015209. PMID 10343098. S2CID 8087808.
  9. ^ Altara R, Gu YM, Struijker-Boudier HA, Thijs L, Staessen JA, Blankesteijn WM (2015). "Left Ventricular Dysfunction and CXCR3 Ligands in Hypertension: From Animal Experiments to a Population-Based Pilot Study". PLOS ONE. 10 (10): e0141394. Bibcode:2015PLoSO..1041394A. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0141394. PMC 4624781. PMID 26506526.
  10. ^ Altara R, Manca M, Hessel MH, Gu Y, van Vark LC, Akkerhuis KM, Staessen JA, Struijker-Boudier HA, Booz GW, Blankesteijn WM (August 2016). "CXCL10 Is a Circulating Inflammatory Marker in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure: a Pilot Study" (PDF). Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research. 9 (4): 302–14. doi:10.1007/s12265-016-9703-3. PMID 27271043. S2CID 41188765.

External links

Further reading