Talk:Dextrocardia

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Un-curated original Version of Dextrocardia discussion

1 in 8000

I really doubt that 1 in 8000 people have this. Can we get someone to cite this? Oddity- (talk) 07:22, 30 May 2008 (UTC)[reply]

The numbers are completely unreasonable. The article says that 1 in 8000000 has situs inversus, 1 in 40000000000 has situs inversus totalis and 1 in 1000000000000 has Kartagener's syndrome. Something is clearly very, very wrong. Carl T (talk) 13:10, 13 July 2008 (UTC)[reply]
Primary ciliary dyskinesia (Kartagener's syndrome) claims an estimate of 1 case in 32,000-15,000, with citations nuffin (talk) 18:50, 23 July 2008 (UTC)[reply]
=============

Indeed, the numbers look nonsensical. It currently says "Dextrocardia is believed to occur in approximately 1 in 12,000 people, while one of 30 of these will have situs inversus. Totalis occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 of dextrocardia situs inversus. Kartagener’s syndrome occurs in approximately 1 in 25 of totalis."

This would imply that 1 person in 45,000,000,000 (45 billion) has Kartagener’s syndrome, compared to a world population of under 7 billion.

I will try to remove the misleading numbers in the article. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 170.194.32.42 (talk) 15:00, 17 June 2010 (UTC)[reply]

Some histologic information...

Just read that dextrocardia is related to immotile cilia syndrome and the (mis)placement of the heart results from an inability to move organs to their normal position (e.g. more to the left side) due to anomalous embryogenosis. Immotile cilia syndrome results from defective genes which code for ciliary proteins and concomitant symptoms associated with defective or absent cilia include: dextrocardia, air sinuses in the skull, and dysfunctional mucociliary escalator. Michael Batech 07:14, 5 March 2010 (UTC)

Some histologic information...

Just read that dextrocardia is related to immotile cilia syndrome and the (mis)placement of the heart results from an inability to move organs to their normal position (e.g. more to the left side) due to anomalous embryogenosis. Immotile cilia syndrome results from defective genes which code for ciliary proteins and concomitant symptoms associated with defective or absent cilia include: dextrocardia, air sinuses in the skull, and dysfunctional mucociliary escalator. Michael Batech 07:14, 5 March 2010 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Oldschoolcool (talkcontribs)

Regarding the image

A reader wrote in to OTRS (ticket 2011020410001216) with the following information regarding the image in this article:

The text in your brief article on Dextrocardia is OK but you have a picture labelled 'dextrocardia' in which a gastric airbubble is clearly seen on the patients RIGHT side...therefrore you are showing a case of' 'dextrocardia with situs inversus', not pure 'dextrocardia' The image needs to be re-labbeled.

Please review this information and make corrections as necessary. I would do so, but I am not familiar with this topic. Thanks! ···日本穣? · 投稿 · Talk to Nihonjoe · Join WikiProject Japan! 05:02, 4 February 2011 (UTC)[reply]

1 in 5,000?

"Totalis occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 of dextrocardia situs inversus." This doesn't sound correct at all. That number sounds off. I think that number is more inline with the number of people with situs inversus that have levocardia, because unless I'm just completely mistaken, situs inversus with dextrocardia is situs inversus totalis (I have situs inversus totalis, so I'm fairly familiar with the subject). As these numbers are unsourced, I'm making a note here that I'm removing this information. - SudoGhost 05:46, 28 July 2011 (UTC)[reply]

what is "isolated dextrocardia"?

Our article presently says (in the lead) that "dextrocardia of embryonic arrest" and "isolated dextrocardia" are the same thing.

But the subsection on the topic says that dextrocardia of embryonic arrest

  • "is commonly associated with severe defects of the heart and related abnormalities"

while http://www.pted.org/?id=dextrocardia1 says

  • "Isolated dextrocardia (i.e. without any other associated heart defects) is a rare condition and occurs with equal frequency in males and females."

These two definitions are virtually opposites. Boud (talk) 20:06, 8 January 2013 (UTC)[reply]

The present en.Wikipedia definition in the lead is echoed widely in other online sources, but that doesn't make it right - it only makes it an urban legend... Boud (talk) 20:34, 8 January 2013 (UTC)[reply]

Chest X ray - suspect this is situs inversus totalis

Based on the elevated left hemidiaphragm (normally on the right) and the air spaces below the right hemidiaphragm (more commonly found on the left, in the stomach) I suspect that the image near the top of the article is of a person with situs inversus totalis. I've made comment to this effect on the talk page for the image on Commons because clarification of this from the submitter would be nice, so that the image could be described in a bit more detail - it's relevant to its inclusion in this article. This associated abdominal image reinforces this impression, but again does not include enough explicit detail to include details in this article. — soupvector (talk) 20:40, 22 November 2015 (UTC)[reply]

thank you for having commented here[1] sometimes Commons images and videos afford little detail --Ozzie10aaaa (talk) 00:23, 23 November 2015 (UTC)[reply]

Reformatted version of pre-2016 discussion (with subsequent comments)

   (Hopefully a colleague used to triggering by hand the fairly automated discussion-archiving process will soon archive the originals in the above top-level section -- which belong in archive despite my reformatting of the same content, and should not just be removed from this page.) They should be archived in that form, tho i think they will be more readable after i reformat, below, on copies of them.)
--Jerzyt 04:58, 3 February 2017 (UTC)[reply]

1 in ....

1 in 8,000

I really doubt that 1 in 8000 people have this. Can we get someone to cite this?
--Oddity- (talk) 07:22, 30 May 2008 (UTC)[reply]

The numbers are completely unreasonable. The article says that 1 in 8000000 has situs inversus, 1 in 40000000000 has situs inversus totalis and 1 in 1000000000000 has Kartagener's syndrome. Something is clearly very, very wrong.
-- Carl T (talk) 13:10, 13 July 2008 (UTC)[reply]
Primary ciliary dyskinesia (Kartagener's syndrome) claims an estimate of 1 case in 32,000-15,000, with citations
--nuffin (talk) 18:50, 23 July 2008 (UTC)[reply]

I removed here too many uninterrupted equal signs to count, likewise too many to be treated as wiki-markup.
   Clearly the following comment concerned with a 1:5000 ratio is
similar to the preceding 1:8000, tho it's not immediately clear if they are competing or revised figures for the same phenomenon, or just two ratios for related phenomena. In either case, it's likely to be helpful to position them close to each other to facilitate clearer discussion of their similarities and differences.
--Jerzyt 06:10, 3 February 2017 (UTC)[reply]

Colleague Carl T's three big numbers are the same as 8,000,000, and 40,000,000,000, (40 (American) billion) and 1,000,000,000,000 (1 (American) trillion).
--Jerzyt 06:23, 3 February 2017 (UTC)[reply]

1 in 5,000

Indeed, the numbers look nonsensical. It currently says "Dextrocardia is believed to occur in approximately 1 in 12,000 people, while one of 30 of these will have situs inversus. Totalis occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 of dextrocardia situs inversus. Kartagener’s syndrome occurs in approximately 1 in 25 of totalis."

This would imply that 1 person in 45,000,000,000 (45 billion) has Kartagener’s syndrome, compared to a world population of under 7 billion.

I will try to remove the misleading numbers in the article.
—Preceding unsigned comment added by 170.194.32.42 (talk) 15:00, 17 June 2010 (UTC)[reply]

The record of the signbot edit verifies that the three paragraphs are part of a single edit.
--Jerzyt 06:10, 3 February 2017 (UTC)[reply]

1 in 5,000?

"Totalis occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 of dextrocardia situs inversus." This doesn't sound correct at all. That number sounds off. I think that number is more inline with the number of people with situs inversus that have levocardia, because unless I'm just completely mistaken, situs inversus with dextrocardia is situs inversus totalis (I have situs inversus totalis, so I'm fairly familiar with the subject). As these numbers are unsourced, I'm making a note here that I'm removing this information.
-- SudoGhost 05:46, 28 July 2011 (UTC)[reply]


1 in 5,000

Indeed, the numbers look nonsensical. It currently says "Dextrocardia is believed to occur in approximately 1 in 12,000 people, while one of 30 of these will have situs inversus. Totalis occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 of dextrocardia situs inversus. Kartagener’s syndrome occurs in approximately 1 in 25 of totalis."

This would imply that 1 person in 45,000,000,000 (45 billion) has Kartagener’s syndrome, compared to a world population of under 7 billion.

I will try to remove the misleading numbers in the article.
—Preceding unsigned comment added by 170.194.32.42 (talk) 15:00, 17 June 2010 (UTC)[reply]

The record of the signbot edit verifies that the three paragraphs are part of a single edit.
--Jerzyt 06:10, 3 February 2017 (UTC)[reply]

1 in 5,000?

"Totalis occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 of dextrocardia situs inversus." This doesn't sound correct at all. That number sounds off. I think that number is more inline with the number of people with situs inversus that have levocardia, because unless I'm just completely mistaken, situs inversus with dextrocardia is situs inversus totalis (I have situs inversus totalis, so I'm fairly familiar with the subject). As these numbers are unsourced, I'm making a note here that I'm removing this information.
-- SudoGhost 05:46, 28 July 2011 (UTC)[reply]

Some histologic information...

Just read that dextrocardia is related to immotile cilia syndrome and the (mis)placement of the heart results from an inability to move organs to their normal position (e.g. more to the left side) due to anomalous embryogenosis. Immotile cilia syndrome results from defective genes which code for ciliary proteins and concomitant symptoms associated with defective or absent cilia include: dextrocardia, air sinuses in the skull, and dysfunctional mucociliary escalator.
--Michael Batech 07:14, 5 March 2010 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Oldschoolcool (talkcontribs)

  • The original markup had two copies of the supposed "Michael Batech" contrib with (with, as experienced editors will notice, manually typed copies of what would normally be the user's WP account name. The edit history shows that the times are accurate, the account used was in both cases that of User:Oldschoolcool, who at this writing has no user page.
    --Jerzyt 06:10, 3 February 2017 (UTC)[reply]


(Images)

Regarding the image

A reader wrote in to OTRS (ticket 2011020410001216) with the following information regarding the image in this article:

The text in your brief article on Dextrocardia is OK but you have a picture labelled 'dextrocardia' in which a gastric airbubble is clearly seen on the patients RIGHT side...therefrore you are showing a case of' 'dextrocardia with situs inversus', not pure 'dextrocardia' The image needs to be re-labbeled.

Please review this information and make corrections as necessary. I would do so, but I am not familiar with this topic. Thanks!
-- ···日本穣? · 投稿 · Talk to Nihonjoe · Join WikiProject Japan! 05:02, 4 February 2011 (UTC)[reply]

Chest X ray - suspect this is situs inversus totalis

Based on the elevated left hemidiaphragm (normally on the right) and the air spaces below the right hemidiaphragm (more commonly found on the left, in the stomach) I suspect that the image near the top of the article is of a person with situs inversus totalis. I've made comment to this effect on the talk page for the image on Commons because clarification of this from the submitter would be nice, so that the image could be described in a bit more detail - it's relevant to its inclusion in this article. This associated abdominal image reinforces this impression, but again does not include enough explicit detail to include details in this article.
soupvector (talk) 20:40, 22 November 2015 (UTC)[reply]

thank you for having commented here[2] sometimes Commons images and videos afford little detail
----Ozzie10aaaa (talk) 00:23, 23 November 2015 (UTC)[reply]


what is "isolated dextrocardia"?

Our article presently says (in the lead) that "dextrocardia of embryonic arrest" and "isolated dextrocardia" are the same thing.

But the subsection on the topic says that dextrocardia of embryonic arrest

  • "is commonly associated with severe defects of the heart and related abnormalities"

while http://www.pted.org/?id=dextrocardia1 says

  • "Isolated dextrocardia (i.e. without any other associated heart defects) is a rare condition and occurs with equal frequency in males and females."

These two definitions are virtually opposites.
--Boud (talk) 20:06, 8 January 2013 (UTC)[reply]

The present en.Wikipedia definition in the lead is echoed widely in other online sources, but that doesn't make it right - it only makes it an urban legend...
--Boud (talk) 20:34, 8 January 2013 (UTC)[reply]

Incoherently expressed classification

So is it two or three different kinds? 2001:171B:2274:7C21:5596:41C4:DCD6:E969 (talk) 20:09, 9 October 2021 (UTC)[reply]