Sulconazole

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Sulconazole
Sulconazole.svg
Names
Trade namesExelderm
  • 1-(2-{[(4-Chlorophenyl)methyl]sulfanyl}-2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl)-1H-imidazole
Clinical data
Drug classAntifungal (imidazole)[1]
Main usesAthlete's foot, ringworm, jock itch, pityriasis versicolor[1]
Side effectsItching, burning, and redness of the skin[1]
Routes of
use
Topical
External links
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
US NLMSulconazole
MedlinePlusa698018
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC18H15Cl3N2S
Molar mass397.74 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • Clc1ccc(c(Cl)c1)C(SCc2ccc(Cl)cc2)Cn3ccnc3
  • InChI=1S/C18H15Cl3N2S/c19-14-3-1-13(2-4-14)11-24-18(10-23-8-7-22-12-23)16-6-5-15(20)9-17(16)21/h1-9,12,18H,10-11H2 checkY
  • Key:AFNXATANNDIXLG-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
 ☒NcheckY (what is this?)  (verify)

Sulconazole, sold under the brand name Exelderm, is a medication used to treat athlete's foot, ringworm, jock itch, and pityriasis versicolor.[1] It is applied to the skin as a cream or solution].[1]

Common side effects include itching, burning, and redness of the skin.[1] Other side effects may include contact dermatitis.[1] It is an antifungal in the imidazole class.[1] It is believed to work by altering the cellular membrane of the fungus.[1]

Sulconazole was approved for medical use in the United States in 1985.[1] In the United States a 60 gram tube of medication costs about 570 USD as of 2021.[2]

Medical uses

Dosage

It is applied up to twice per day for 3 to 8 weeks.[1]

Research

Although not used commercially for insect control, sulconazole nitrate exhibits a strong anti-feeding effect on the keratin-digesting Australian carpet beetle larvae Anthrenocerus australis.[3]

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 "Sulconazole Monograph for Professionals". Drugs.com. Retrieved 15 October 2021.
  2. "Sulconazole Prices, Coupons & Savings Tips - GoodRx". GoodRx. Retrieved 15 October 2021.
  3. Sunderland MR, Cruickshank RH, Leighs SJ (2014). "The efficacy of antifungal azole and antiprotozoal compounds in protection of wool from keratin-digesting insect larvae". Textile Research Journal. 84 (9): 924–931. doi:10.1177/0040517513515312.

External links

Identifiers: