Sulconazole

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Sulconazole
Sulconazole.svg
Names
Trade namesExelderm
  • 1-(2-{[(4-Chlorophenyl)methyl]sulfanyl}-2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl)-1H-imidazole
Clinical data
Drug classAntifungal (imidazole)[1]
Main usesAthlete's foot, ringworm, jock itch, pityriasis versicolor[1]
Side effectsItching, burning, and redness of the skin[1]
Routes of
use
Topical
External links
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
US NLMSulconazole
MedlinePlusa698018
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC18H15Cl3N2S
Molar mass397.74 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • Clc1ccc(c(Cl)c1)C(SCc2ccc(Cl)cc2)Cn3ccnc3
  • InChI=1S/C18H15Cl3N2S/c19-14-3-1-13(2-4-14)11-24-18(10-23-8-7-22-12-23)16-6-5-15(20)9-17(16)21/h1-9,12,18H,10-11H2 checkY
  • Key:AFNXATANNDIXLG-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY

Sulconazole, sold under the brand name Exelderm, is a medication used to treat athlete's foot, ringworm, jock itch, and pityriasis versicolor.[1] It is applied to the skin as a cream or solution].[1]

Common side effects include itching, burning, and redness of the skin.[1] Other side effects may include contact dermatitis.[1] It is an antifungal in the imidazole class.[1] It is believed to work by altering the cellular membrane of the fungus.[1]

Sulconazole was approved for medical use in the United States in 1985.[1] In the United States a 60 gram tube of medication costs about 570 USD as of 2021.[2]

Medical uses

Dosage

It is applied up to twice per day for 3 to 8 weeks.[1]

Research

Although not used commercially for insect control, sulconazole nitrate exhibits a strong anti-feeding effect on the keratin-digesting Australian carpet beetle larvae Anthrenocerus australis.[3]

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 "Sulconazole Monograph for Professionals". Drugs.com. Archived from the original on 25 January 2021. Retrieved 15 October 2021.
  2. "Sulconazole Prices, Coupons & Savings Tips - GoodRx". GoodRx. Retrieved 15 October 2021.
  3. Sunderland MR, Cruickshank RH, Leighs SJ (2014). "The efficacy of antifungal azole and antiprotozoal compounds in protection of wool from keratin-digesting insect larvae". Textile Research Journal. 84 (9): 924–931. doi:10.1177/0040517513515312.

External links

Identifiers: