Sinecatechins

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Sinecatechins
A botanical drawing showing a plant with green leaves and white flowers
Sinecatechins is an extract from the leaves of Camellia sinensis.
Names
Trade namesVeregen, Polyphenon E
Clinical data
Main usesGenital warts[1]
Side effectsBurning, itchiness, swelling, redness at the site of use[1]
Pregnancy
category
External links
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
US NLMSinecatechins

Sinecatechins, sold under the trade name Veregen, is a medication used to treat external genital warts.[1] It is applied to the affected area.[1] This can be done by the person themselves.[2]

Common side effects include burning, itchiness, swelling, and redness at the site of use.[1] Other side effects may include phimosis, enlarged lymph nodes, burning with urination, and reactivation of genital herpes.[2] How it works is not known.[2]

Sinecatechins was approved for medical use in the United States in 2006.[1] In the United States it costs about 1,400 USD for a tube as of 2021.[3] It was the first botanical drug approved in the USA and is made from green tea leaves.[2]

Medical uses

It is used to treat external genital warts.[4][2][5]

Dosage

The 15% solution is applied three times per day to the affected area.[1] Treatment may last for 16 weeks.[2]

Manufacture

It is a specific water extract of green tea leaves from Camellia sinensis. Sinecatechins are mostly catechins, 55% of which is epigallocatechin gallate.[6]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 "Sinecatechins Monograph for Professionals". Drugs.com. Retrieved 12 October 2021.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Masters KP (2009). "New Drug Reviews: Sinecatechins (Veregen) for External Genital and Perianal Warts". Am Fam Physician. 80 (12): 1447–1454.
  3. "Veregen Prices, Coupons & Patient Assistance Programs". Drugs.com. Retrieved 12 October 2021.
  4. "Veregen label information" (PDF). Retrieved 2015-05-02.
  5. Fürst R, Zündorf I (2014). "Plant-derived anti-inflammatory compounds: hopes and disappointments regarding the translation of preclinical knowledge into clinical progress". Mediators Inflamm. 2014: 146832. doi:10.1155/2014/146832. PMC 4060065. PMID 24987194.
  6. Mayeaux EJ, Dunton C (July 2008). "Modern management of external genital warts". J Low Genit Tract Dis. 12 (3): 185–192. doi:10.1097/LGT.0b013e31815dd4b4. PMID 18596459. S2CID 33302840.