Nelarabine

From WikiProjectMed
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Nelarabine
Nelarabine structure.svg
Nelarabine ball-and-stick.png
Names
Trade namesArranon, Atriance
Other names506U78
Clinical data
Drug classAntimetabolite[1]
Main usesAcute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoma[2]
Side effectsBone marrow suppression, sleepiness, headache, numbness, fever, swelling, vomiting[2]
Pregnancy
category
  • US: N (Not classified yet)
Routes of
use
Intravenous
External links
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
US NLMNelarabine
MedlinePlusa607077
Legal
License data
Legal status
Pharmacokinetics
Protein binding<25%
MetabolismBy adenosine deaminase, to 9-β-D-arabinofuranosylguanine
Elimination half-life30 minutes (nelarabine)
3 hours (ara-G)
ExcretionKidney
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC11H15N5O5
Molar mass297.271 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • n2c1c(nc(nc1OC)N)n(c2)[C@@H]3O[C@@H]([C@@H](O)[C@@H]3O)CO
  • InChI=1S/C11H15N5O5/c1-20-9-5-8(14-11(12)15-9)16(3-13-5)10-7(19)6(18)4(2-17)21-10/h3-4,6-7,10,17-19H,2H2,1H3,(H2,12,14,15)/t4-,6-,7+,10-/m1/s1 checkY
  • Key:IXOXBSCIXZEQEQ-UHTZMRCNSA-N checkY

Nelarabine, sold under the brand names Arranon and Atriance , is a medication used to treat T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL).[2] It is used when other treatments are not effective.[2] It is given by gradual injection into a vein.[2]

Common side effects include bone marrow suppression, sleepiness, headache, numbness, fever, swelling, and vomiting.[2] Other side effects may include confusion, seizures, tumor lysis syndrome, and peripheral neuropathy.[2] Use in pregnancy may harm the baby.[2] It is an antimetabolite which replaces guanine and interferes with the making of new DNA.[1]

Nelarabine was approved for medical use in the United States and Europe in 2005.[5][1] In the United Kingdom six vials of 250 mg cost the NHS about £1,300 as of 2021.[6] In the United States this amount costs about 4,600 USD.[7]

Medical uses

Dosage

In adults it is used at a dose of 1500 mg/m2 on day 1, 3, and 5 out of 21 days.[5]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "Atriance". Archived from the original on 12 November 2020. Retrieved 12 November 2021.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 "Nelarabine Monograph for Professionals". Drugs.com. Archived from the original on 6 May 2021. Retrieved 12 November 2021.
  3. "Arranon- nelarabine injection". DailyMed. 11 June 2020. Archived from the original on 17 October 2020. Retrieved 4 December 2020.
  4. "Atriance EPAR". European Medicines Agency (EMA). Archived from the original on 12 November 2020. Retrieved 4 December 2020.
  5. 5.0 5.1 "DailyMed - ARRANON- nelarabine injection". dailymed.nlm.nih.gov. Archived from the original on 17 October 2020. Retrieved 12 November 2021.
  6. BNF 81: March-September 2021. BMJ Group and the Pharmaceutical Press. 2021. p. 960. ISBN 978-0857114105.
  7. "Arranon Prices, Coupons & Patient Assistance Programs". Drugs.com. Retrieved 12 November 2021.

External links

External sites:
Identifiers: