Methazolamide

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Methazolamide
Methazolamide.svg
Ball-and-stick model of the methazolamide molecule
Names
Other namesN-(3-Methyl-5-sulfamoyl-3H-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylidene) ethanamide
  • N-[5-(aminosulfonyl)-3-methyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2(3H)-ylidene]acetamide
Clinical data
Drug classCarbonic anhydrase inhibitor[1]
Main usesGlaucoma[1]
Side effectsNumbness, hearing problems, tiredness, nausea, diarrhea, sleepiness[1]
Pregnancy
category
  • US: C (Risk not ruled out)
Routes of
use
By mouth
Onset of actionWithin 4 hrs[1]
Duration of actionUp to 18 hrs[1]
External links
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
US NLMMethazolamide
MedlinePlusa601233
Legal
Legal status
Pharmacokinetics
Protein binding~55%
Elimination half-life~14 hours
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC5H8N4O3S2
Molar mass236.26 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • O=S(=O)(C\1=N\N(C(=N/C(=O)C)/S/1)C)N
  • InChI=1S/C5H8N4O3S2/c1-3(10)7-4-9(2)8-5(13-4)14(6,11)12/h1-2H3,(H2,6,11,12)/b7-4- checkY
  • Key:FLOSMHQXBMRNHR-DAXSKMNVSA-N checkY
 ☒NcheckY (what is this?)  (verify)

Methazolamide, sold under the brand name Neptazane among, is a medication used to treat increased intraocular pressure (IOP) including in glaucoma.[1] It is taken by mouth.[1] Effects begin within 4 hours and last for up to 18 hours.[1]

Common side effects include numbness, hearing problems, tiredness, nausea, diarrhea, and sleepiness.[1] Other side effects may include Stevens-Johnson syndrome.[1] It is an carbonic anhydrase inhibitor which decreases the production of aqueous humor.[1]

Methazolamide was approved for medical use in the United States in 1950s.[1][2] In the United States 60 tablets of 50 mg costs about 125 USD as of 2021.[3]

Medical uses

It is used for open angle glaucoma and secondary glaucoma.[1] Also it is used preoperatively in acute angle-closure (narrow-angle) glaucoma where lowering the IOP is desired before surgery.[1]

Dosage

The typical dose is 50 to 100 mg two or three times per day.[1]

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 "Methazolamide Monograph for Professionals". Drugs.com. Retrieved 17 November 2021.
  2. Supuran, Claudiu T.; Nocentini, Alessio (17 July 2019). Carbonic Anhydrases: Biochemistry and Pharmacology of an Evergreen Pharmaceutical Target. Academic Press. p. 271. ISBN 978-0-12-816745-8.
  3. "Methazolamide Prices, Coupons & Savings Tips - GoodRx". GoodRx. Retrieved 17 November 2021.

External links

Identifiers: