Isoconazole

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Isoconazole
Isoconazole.svg
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.comInternational Drug Names
ATC code
Identifiers
  • (RS)-1-[2-[(2,6-Dichlorobenzyl)oxy]-2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.044.084 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC18H14Cl4N2O
Molar mass416.12 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • Clc1ccc(c(Cl)c1)C(OCc2c(Cl)cccc2Cl)Cn3ccnc3

Isoconazole is an azole antifungal drug and could inhibit gram positive bacteria.[1][2] For foot and vaginal infections, isoconazole has a similar effectiveness to clotrimazole.[3][4] Isoconazole nitrate may be used in combination with corticosteroid diflucortolone to increase its bioavailability.[1]

It was patented in 1968 and approved for medical use in 1979.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b Veraldi S (May 2013). "Isoconazole nitrate: a unique broad-spectrum antimicrobial azole effective in the treatment of dermatomycoses, both as monotherapy and in combination with corticosteroids". Mycoses. 56 (Suppl 1): 3–15. doi:10.1111/myc.12054. PMID 23574019. S2CID 1881151.
  2. ^ "Isoconazole". The Merck Index (12th ed.). p. 5176.
  3. ^ Oyeka CA, Gugnani HC (1992). "Isoconazole nitrate versus clotrimazole in foot and nail infections due to Hendersonula toruloidea, Scytalidium hyalinum and dermatophytes". Mycoses. 35 (11–12): 357–61. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0507.1992.tb00894.x. PMID 1302811. S2CID 6764090.
  4. ^ Cohen L (February 1984). "Single dose treatment of vaginal candidosis: comparison of clotrimazole and isoconazole". The British Journal of Venereal Diseases. 60 (1): 42–4. doi:10.1136/sti.60.1.42. PMC 1046268. PMID 6365236.
  5. ^ Fischer J, Ganellin CR (2006). Analogue-based Drug Discovery. John Wiley & Sons. p. 502. ISBN 9783527607495.