Iotroxic acid

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Iotroxic acid
Iotroxic acid.png
Names
Trade namesBiliscopin, others
  • 3-{2-[2-(2-{[(3-carboxy-2,4,6-triiodophenyl)carbamoyl]methoxy}ethoxy)ethoxy]acetamido}-2,4,6-triiodobenzoic acid
Clinical data
Defined daily dosenot established[1]
External links
AHFS/Drugs.comInternational Drug Names
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
ATC code
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC22H18I6N2O9
Molar mass1215.818 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • O=C(Nc1c(I)c(c(I)cc1I)C(=O)O)COCCOCCOCC(=O)Nc2c(I)c(C(=O)O)c(I)cc2I

Iotroxic acid, also known as meglumine iotroxate, is a molecule used as a contrast medium during X-rays.[2][3] It is specifically used during tests looking at the gallbladder and biliary tract.[3] It is given by slow injection into a vein.[3]

Side effects are uncommon.[4] They include vomiting, skin flushing, headache, itchiness, and low blood pressure.[3] Rare side effects include seizures and allergic reactions.[3] It should not be used by those who have an iodine allergy.[3] Iotroxic acid is an iodine containing contrast media of the diionic dimer type.[5]

Iotroxic acid was first made in 1976.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines.[7] It is rarely used in the developed world due to the availability of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP).[8]

Dosage

The defined daily dose is not established.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "WHOCC - ATC/DDD Index". www.whocc.no. Retrieved 15 September 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. "Iotroxic Acid - Drugs.com". www.drugs.com. Archived from the original on 31 December 2016. Retrieved 31 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 World Health Organization (2009). Stuart MC, Kouimtzi M, Hill SR (eds.). WHO Model Formulary 2008. World Health Organization. pp. 315, 318. hdl:10665/44053. ISBN 9789241547659.
  4. Neugebauer, Edmund; Sauerland, Stefan (2014). Recommendations for evidence-based endoscopic surgery: The updated EAES consensus development conferences. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 67. ISBN 9782817808499. Archived from the original on 2017-01-01. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. Schaefer, Christof; Peters, Paul W. J.; Miller, Richard K. (2014). Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation: Treatment Options and Risk Assessment. Academic Press. p. 532. ISBN 9780124079014. Archived from the original on 2017-01-01. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. Korolkovas, Andrejus (1988). Essentials of Medicinal Chemistry. Wiley. p. 1063. ISBN 9780471883562. Archived from the original on 2017-01-01. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. World Health Organization (2019). World Health Organization model list of essential medicines: 21st list 2019. Geneva: World Health Organization. hdl:10665/325771. WHO/MVP/EMP/IAU/2019.06. License: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO.
  8. Sherlock, Shiela; Dooley, James (2008). Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System. John Wiley & Sons. p. 568. ISBN 9780470986813. Archived from the original on 2017-01-01. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links

  • "Iotroxic Acid". Drug Information Portal. U.S. National Library of Medicine.