Difluprednate

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Difluprednate
Difluprednate.svg
Difluprednate 3D.png
Names
  • [(6S,8S,9R,10S,11S,13S,14S,17R)-17-(2-acetyloxyacetyl)-6,9-difluoro-11-hydroxy-10,13-dimethyl-3-oxo-6,7,8,11,12,14,15,16-octahydrocyclopenta[a]phenanthren-17-yl] butanoate
Clinical data
Drug classCorticosteroid[1]
Main usesPain and inflammation following eye surgery[1]
Side effectsInflammation of the eyelids, sensitivity to light, eye redness[1]
Routes of
use
Topical
External links
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
US NLMDifluprednate
MedlinePlusa609025
Legal
License data
Legal status
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC27H34F2O7
Molar mass508.551 g·mol−1

Difluprednate (DFBA), sold under the brand name Durezol is a corticosteroid used to treat pain and inflammation following eye surgery.[1] It is used as an eye drop.[1] Those who use it should not wear contacts.[1]

Common side effects include inflammation of the eyelids, sensitivity to light, and eye redness.[1] Other side effects may include increased eye pressure, cataracts, slow healing, and infection.[2] Safety in pregnancy is unclear.[2]

Difluprednate was approved for medical use in the United States in 2008.[1] It is available as a generic medication.[3] In the United States 5 ml costs about 60 USD as of 2021.[3] It was originally made from prednisolone.[1]

Medical uses

Dosage

One drop is used 4 times per day.[1]

Chemistry

It is chemically a butyrate ester of 6(alpha),9(alpha)-difluoro prednisolone acetate.

History

On June 24, 2008, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved difluprednate for the treatment of post-operative ocular inflammation and pain.[4] It is marketed by Alcon under the tradename Durezol.

Society and culture

Cost

The medication in the U.S. is $226 (USD) for 5 ml of ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% [5]

Research

Difluprednate ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% is also being studied in other ocular inflammatory diseases, including a }Phase 3 study evaluating difluprednate for the treatment of anterior uveitis[6][7]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 "Difluprednate Monograph for Professionals". Drugs.com. Archived from the original on 29 September 2021. Retrieved 24 December 2021.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "DailyMed - DIFLUPREDNATE- difluprednate ophthalmic emulsion". dailymed.nlm.nih.gov. Archived from the original on 11 January 2022. Retrieved 26 December 2021.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Difluprednate Prices, Coupons & Savings Tips - GoodRx". GoodRx. Archived from the original on 19 May 2016. Retrieved 26 December 2021.
  4. "Sirion Therapeutics Announces FDA Approval of Durezol for Treatment of Postoperative Ocular Inflammation and Pain" (Press release). Sirion Therapeutics, Inc. 2008-06-24. Archived from the original on 2008-06-28. Retrieved 2008-06-30.
  5. "Durezol Prices, Coupons & Patient Assistance Programs". Drugs.com. Archived from the original on 18 August 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2021.
  6. Clinical trial number NCT00501579 for "Study of Difluprednate in the Treatment of Uveitis" at ClinicalTrials.gov
  7. Sheppard JD, Toyos MM, Kempen JH, Kaur P, Foster CS (May 2014). "Difluprednate 0.05% versus prednisolone acetate 1% for endogenous anterior uveitis: a phase III, multicenter, randomized study". Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. 55 (5): 2993–3002. doi:10.1167/iovs.13-12660. PMC 4581692. PMID 24677110.

External links

Identifiers: