Diflorasone diacetate

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Diflorasone diacetate
Diflorasone diacetate.png
Names
Trade namesPsorcon, Florone, others
  • [17-(2-Acetyloxyacetyl)- 6,9-difluoro-11-hydroxy-10,13,16-trimethyl-3-oxo-6,7,8,11,12,14,15,16- octahydrocyclopenta[a]phenanthren-17-yl] acetate
Clinical data
Drug classTopical steroid[1]
Main usesAtopic dermatitis, psoriasis, allergic contact dermatitis[1]
Side effectsIrritation, folliculitis, acne, decreased pigmentation, perioral dermatitis, infection, increased hair, striae[1]
Pregnancy
category
  • US: C (Risk not ruled out)
Routes of
use
Topical
External links
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
US NLMDiflorasone diacetate
MedlinePlusa602019
Legal
License data
Legal status
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC26H32F2O7
Molar mass494.532 g·mol−1
  • InChI=1S/C26H32F2O7/c1-13-8-17-18-10-20(27)19-9-16(31)6-7-23(19,4)25(18,28)21(32)11-24(17,5)26(13,35-15(3)30)22(33)12-34-14(2)29/h6-7,9,13,17-18,20-21,32H,8,10-12H2,1-5H3/t13-,17-,18-,20-,21-,23-,24-,25-,26-/m0/s1 checkY
  • Key:BOBLHFUVNSFZPJ-JOYXJVLSSA-N checkY

Diflorasone diacetate, sold under the brand name Psorcon among others, is a topical steroid.[1] It is used for atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and allergic contact dermatitis.[1]

Common side effects include irritation, folliculitis, acne, decreased pigmentation, perioral dermatitis, infection, increased hair, and striae.[1] Other side effects may include Cushing's syndrome and allergic reactions.[1] Safety in pregnancy is unclear.[1] The strength in the United States is classified as group III.[2]

Diflorasone diacetate was approved for medical use in the United States in 1977.[1] It is available as a generic medication.[3] In the United States a 30 gram tube costs about 65 USD as of 2021.[3]

Medical uses

Dosage

It may be used once to four times per day.[1]

Side effects

No long-term animal studies have been done to determine whether diflorasone diacetate could have carcinogenic properties.[citation needed]

Little data is available regarding whether diflorasone diacetate would be present in great enough quantities to cause harm to a infant.[4]

Society and culture

It is manufactured by E. Fougera & Co.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 "Diflorasone Monograph for Professionals". Drugs.com. Archived from the original on 19 January 2021. Retrieved 28 December 2021.
  2. "Topical Corticosteroids: Overview". 9 July 2021. Archived from the original on 19 August 2021. Retrieved 28 December 2021.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Diflorasone Prices, Coupons & Savings Tips - GoodRx". GoodRx. Archived from the original on 12 May 2016. Retrieved 28 December 2021.
  4. "Diflorasone topical". Drugs.com. Archived from the original on 2020-11-17. Retrieved 2020-11-12.

External links

Identifiers: