Deucravacitinib

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Deucravacitinib
Deucravacitinib.svg
Names
Pronunciation/dˌkrævəˈsɪtɪnɪb/
doo-KRA-və-SI-ti-nib
Trade namesSotyktu
Other namesBMS-986165
  • 6-(Cyclopropanecarbonylamido)-4-[2-methoxy-3-(1-methyl-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)anilino]-N- (trideuteriomethyl)pyridazine-3-carboxamide
Clinical data
Drug classTYK2 inhibitor[1]
Main usesPlaque psoriasis[1]
Side effectsUpper respiratory infections, herpes simplex, folliculitis, acne[1]
Routes of
use
By mouth
Typical dose6 mg OD[1]
External links
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
Legal
Legal status
Pharmacokinetics
Bioavailability99%
Protein binding82–90%
MetabolismLiver (primarily CYP1A2)
MetabolitesBMT-153261 (active)
Elimination half-life10 hours
ExcretionFeces, urine
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC20H22N8O3
Molar mass422.449 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • [2H]C([2H])([2H])NC(=O)C1=NN=C(C=C1NC2=CC=CC(=C2OC)C3=NN(C=N3)C)NC(=O)C4CC4
  • InChI=1S/C20H22N8O3/c1-21-20(30)16-14(9-15(25-26-16)24-19(29)11-7-8-11)23-13-6-4-5-12(17(13)31-3)18-22-10-28(2)27-18/h4-6,9-11H,7-8H2,1-3H3,(H,21,30)(H2,23,24,25,29)/i1D3
  • Key:BZZKEPGENYLQSC-FIBGUPNXSA-N

Deucravacitinib, sold under the brand name Sotyktu, is a medication used to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.[1] It should not be used with other strong immunosuppressants.[1] It is take by mouth.[1]

Common side effects include upper respiratory infections, herpes simplex, folliculitis, and acne.[1] Other side effects may include allergic reactions, infection, cancer, and muscle breakdown.[1] Use in pregnancy is of unclear safety.[1] Use is not recommended in those with significant liver problems.[1] It is a TYK2 inhibitor.[1]

Deucravacitinib was approved for medical use in the United States in 2022.[1] As of 2022 it is not approved in Europe or the United Kingdom.[2] In the United States it costs about 6,200 USD per month.[2]

Medical use

Dosage

It is take at a dose of 6 mg once per day.[1]

Mechanism of action

It acts as a highly selective allosteric inhibitor of non-receptor tyrosine-protein kinase 2 (TYK2).[3]

Molecule design

The chemical structure of deucravacitinib contains a methyl amide in which all three hydrogen atoms are replaced by deuterium.[4]

History

It was developed by Bristol Myers Squibb.[5]

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 "Sotyktu- deucravacitinib tablet, film coated". DailyMed. 9 September 2022. Archived from the original on 28 September 2022. Retrieved 27 September 2022.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Deucravacitinib". SPS - Specialist Pharmacy Service. 1 November 2018. Archived from the original on 29 June 2022. Retrieved 13 December 2022.
  3. Chimalakonda A, Burke J, Cheng L, Catlett I, Tagen M, Zhao Q, et al. (October 2021). "Selectivity Profile of the Tyrosine Kinase 2 Inhibitor Deucravacitinib Compared with Janus Kinase 1/2/3 Inhibitors". Dermatology and Therapy. 11 (5): 1763–1776. doi:10.1007/s13555-021-00596-8. PMC 8484413. PMID 34471993.
  4. Mullard A (September 2022). "First de novo deuterated drug poised for approval". Nature Reviews. Drug Discovery. 21 (9): 623–625. doi:10.1038/d41573-022-00139-6. PMID 35974147. S2CID 251623586.
  5. "U.S. Food and Drug Administration Approves Sotyktu™ (deucravacitinib), Oral Treatment for Adults with Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis". Business Wire (Press release). 10 September 2022. Archived from the original on 10 September 2022. Retrieved 10 September 2022.

External links

External sites:
Identifiers: