Artesunate/amodiaquine

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Artesunate/amodiaquine
Combination of
ArtesunateAntimalarial
AmodiaquineAntimalarial
Names
Trade namesCamoquin, others[1]
Other namesASAQ
Clinical data
Pregnancy
category
  • US: C (Risk not ruled out)
Routes of
use
By mouth[2]
Defined daily dosenot established[3]
 ☒NcheckY (what is this?)  (verify)

Artesunate/amodiaquine, sold under the trade name Camoquin among others, is a medication used for the treatment of malaria.[4][5] It is a fixed-dose combination of artesunate and amodiaquine.[4] Specifically it recommended for acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria.[6] It is taken by mouth.[7]

Common side effects include loss of appetite, nausea, abdominal pain, sleepiness, trouble sleeping, and cough.[8] Safety in pregnancy is not clear; however, the medication may be used if others are not possible.[8] It is believed to be safe for use during breastfeeding.[8] Artesunate and amodiaquine are both antimalarial medication; however, work by different mechanisms.[8]

Artesunate/amodiaquine was commercially launched in 2007.[9] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines.[4] Artesunate/amodiaquine is available as a generic medication.[9] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$0.85 to US$1.52 for a course of treatment.[7] As of 2014 it is not commercially available in the United States or United Kingdom.[1][10]

Medical uses

Early clinical trials showed that a once-a-day dosage was effective.[11] It was subsequently shown to be equally effective as artemether/lumefantrine,[12] although it is likely to be more effective in the field due to its simpler once-a-day dosage compared to artemether/lumefantrine twice-per-day dosage.

Dosage

The defined daily dose is not established.[2] For those who weight more than 35 kg the dose is 200/540 mg one a day, for those who weight 18 to 35 kg the dose is 100/270 mg once a day, for those who weight 9 to 18 kg the dose is 50/135 mg once per day, and for those who weight 4.5 to 9 kg the dose is 25/67.5 mg once per day.[13] Treatment is for three days.[13]

Society and culture

Artesunate/amodiaquine was commercially launched in 2007 as an affordable treatment for malaria, devised by DNDi in partnership with Sanofi-Aventis.[9] ASAQ was handed over to the MMV Access and Product Management Team in May 2015.[14]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Ainsworth, Sean B. (2014). Neonatal Formulary: Drug Use in Pregnancy and the First Year of Life. John Wiley & Sons. p. 75. ISBN 9781118819517. Archived from the original on 2016-12-20. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. 2.0 2.1 "WHOCC - ATC/DDD Index". www.whocc.no. Retrieved 20 September 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named MSH2015
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 World Health Organization (2019). World Health Organization model list of essential medicines: 21st list 2019. Geneva: World Health Organization. hdl:10665/325771. WHO/MVP/EMP/IAU/2019.06. License: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO.
  5. Oyakhirome S, Pötschke M, Schwarz NG, et al. (March 2007). "Artesunate--amodiaquine combination therapy for falciparum malaria in young Gabonese children". Malar. J. 6: 29. doi:10.1186/1475-2875-6-29. PMC 1831475. PMID 17352806.
  6. World Health Organization (2009). Stuart MC, Kouimtzi M, Hill SR (eds.). WHO Model Formulary 2008. World Health Organization. p. 187. hdl:10665/44053. ISBN 9789241547659.
  7. 7.0 7.1 "Artesunate + Amodiaquine". International Drug Price Indicator Guide. Retrieved 8 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 "Artesunate Amodiaquine Winthrop" (PDF). WIPO. August 2010. Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 October 2016. Retrieved 12 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 "New, Once-a-Day Fixed-Dose Combination Against Malaria Now Available – DNDi". www.dndi.org. 1 March 2007. Archived from the original on 20 December 2016. Retrieved 12 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. Goldman, Lee; Schafer, Andrew I. (2015). Goldman-Cecil Medicine. Elsevier Health Sciences. p. 2112. ISBN 9780323322850. Archived from the original on 2016-12-20. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. Ndiaye, Jean; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Sagara, Issaka; Brasseur, Philippe; Ndiaye, Ibrahima; Faye, Babacar; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Forlemu, Doris; Moor, Vicky; Traore, Aminata; Dicko, Yahia; Dara, Niawanlou; Lameyre, Valérie; Diallo, Mouctar; Djimde, Abdoulaye; Same-Ekobo, Albert; Gaye, Oumar (June 2009). "Randomized, multicentre assessment of the efficacy and safety of ASAQ – a fixed-dose artesunate-amodiaquine combination therapy in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria". Malaria Journal. 8: 125. doi:10.1186/1475-2875-8-125. PMC 2698916. PMID 19505304. Archived from the original on 19 September 2011. Retrieved 18 January 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. Nidiaye, Jean-Louis A; Faye, Babacar; Gueye, Ali; Tine, Roger; Ndiaye, Daouda; Tchania, Corinne; Ndiaye, Ibrahima; Barry, Aichatou; Cissé, Badara; Lameyre, Valérie; Gaye, Oumar (2011). "Repeated treatment of recurrent uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Senegal with fixed-dose artesunate plus amodiaquine versus fixed-dose artemether plus lumefantrine: a randomized, open-label trial". Malaria Journal. 10: 237. doi:10.1186/1475-2875-10-237. PMC 3171378. PMID 21838909. Archived from the original on 10 October 2014. Retrieved 18 January 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. 13.0 13.1 "ARTESUNATE/AMODIAQUINE = AS/AQ oral - Essential drugs". medicalguidelines.msf.org. Retrieved 25 August 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. "DNDi passes the ball to MMV | Medicines for Malaria Venture". www.mmv.org. Retrieved 2020-02-13.

External links

Identifiers: